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This site presents student participation and performance data, released September 2017, for the tests that make up the SAT Suite of Assessments. The results are based on:

  • SAT takers from the graduating class of 2017
  • PSAT/NMSQT, PSAT 10, and PSAT 8/9 takers across the 2016-17 school year

The SAT Suite of Assessments

During the 2015-16 school year, the College Board released the new SAT and PSAT/NMSQT, and two new tests, the PSAT 10—a parallel form of the PSAT/NMSQT that 10th graders can take in the spring—and the PSAT 8/9, to create the SAT Suite of Assessments.

Assessments in the SAT Suite work together to measure college readiness over time, focusing on what students are learning in classrooms and what they need to know to succeed in high school, college, and career. The suite also connects students to scholarships, free practice, fee waivers, and free college and career planning tools.

Participation Highlights

This year’s results show a significant uptick in participation, signaling strong momentum for the SAT Suite of Assessments.

  • More than 7.3 million test takers completed the SAT or a PSAT-related assessment in the 2016-17 school year, an increase of more than 650,000 (nearly 10%) compared to 2015-16.
  • The class of 2017 is the largest cohort in SAT history. More than 1.8 million students took the old or new SAT at least once during high school. (1.7 million of these test takers took the new SAT.) 
  • Nearly 4.3 million students took the PSAT/NMSQT or PSAT 10 in the 2016-17 school year, an increase of more than 46,000 students compared to 2015-16.
  • A record 1.3 million students took the PSAT 8/9 in 2016-17, an increase of more than 417,000 students (47%) compared to 2015-16.
  • 42% of students who took the SAT or a PSAT-related assessment in the 2016-17 school year also took an SAT Suite assessment a year earlier, giving them a baseline against which they can monitor progress towards college readiness, access to practice tools, and suggestions for next steps they can take to improve readiness.

Participation growth in the 2016-17 school year is a reflection of state and district education leaders choosing to provide the SAT and PSAT-related assessments to all their students.

  • Full participation in the SAT Suite: This past school year, Michigan, Delaware, the District of Columbia, and 98 districts provided the full SAT Suite of Assessments—defined as the PSAT 8/9, PSAT 10 or PSAT/NMSQT, and SAT—to all their public school students. These states and districts have made it easier for students, parents, and educators to monitor progress toward college readiness—and intervene earlier when students are off track. And they have connected students to more opportunities at every step.
  • SAT School Day participation: Nine states (Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Idaho, Illinois, Maine, Michigan, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island) and the District of Columbia administered the SAT during the school day at no cost to students. That’s in addition to more than 250 school districts, including large districts like Baltimore City Public Schools in Maryland, Broward County School District in Florida, Cleveland Metropolitan School District in Ohio, Houston Independent School District in Texas, Long Beach Unified School District in California, New York City, and Tulsa Public Schools in Oklahoma.

Next year’s results will include data from more than 200,000 students from the class of 2018 who took the SAT during Colorado’s, Illinois’s, and Rhode Island’s first statewide administrations this spring, as well as from tens of thousands of students in large districts that participated in SAT School Day for the first time. Colorado and Illinois switched from offering the ACT to offering the SAT to all juniors as of spring 2017.

Learn more about SAT School Day.

Performance Highlights

  • On PSAT-related assessments, students saw promising performance growth between the 2015-16 and 2016-17 school years. Across nearly all demographics and grade levels, mean scores increased, and a greater percentage of students were on track for college and career readiness. See more detailed results.
  • This year’s report features the first performance results from the new SAT. These results set a new baseline for future year-to-year comparisons.
    • 46% of students in the class of 2017 who took the new SAT met or exceeded the new College and Career Readiness benchmarks, showing they are likely ready to take and succeed in entry-level, credit-bearing college courses.
    • The mean total score for students in the class of 2017 who took the new SAT was 1060. The mean score for the Evidence-Based Reading and Writing section was 533, and the mean score for the Math section was 527. 
  • Students are showing incremental growth as they progress through the SAT Suite of Assessments.
    • 30% of juniors (class of 2019) who took the PSAT 8/9 as 9th graders and the PSAT/NMSQT or PSAT 10 as 10th graders increased their total score by 100 points or more. 7% of students who tested at these two time points were initially off track but got on track for college and career readiness in 2016-17.
    • 34% of seniors (class of 2018) who took the PSAT/NMSQT or PSAT 10 as 10th graders and the PSAT/NMSQT as 11th graders increased their total score by 100 points or more. 9% of students who tested at these two time points were initially off track but got on track for college and career readiness in 2016-17.
    • 35% of recent graduates (class of 2017) who took the PSAT/NMSQT as 11th graders followed by the new SAT increased their total score by 100 points or more. 12% of students who tested at these two time points were initially off track but were college and career ready when they took the SAT.

More Resources

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